Fitness Health

Recognising your mineral balances is key for overall health and wellbeing. Find out how best to maintain your fluid levels and fitness in your body with this test to boost your fitness performance.

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Drive

Improve not only your overall health, but your fitness and athleticism through a detailed account of how you can use these important minerals to boost your performance.

Follow up

You can take your health a step further by booking an appointment with a Fitness Coach to discuss your results through your dashboard.

Is this test for me?

Take the Fitness Health Test if you want to focus on your:

  • Energy
  • Long Term Health
  • Diet
  • Fitness
  • Mood

Did you know?

Approximately 40% of your body weight is muscle mass.

Decode your sample in 3 steps.

1. Order

DNA collection

Order your testing kit online and we'll process it the same day on a 24 hours delivery.

2. Sample

DNA based plan

Collect your sample following the instructions provided with your kit. Send the sample to the lab using the return prepaid envelope.

3. Reports

book an appointment

When your results are ready to view online, you will be notified by email and a member of our support team will contact you as well.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Chloride

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Bicarbonate

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Urea

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.
The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.
When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.
When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Urea

Urea is the final breakdown product of the amino acids found in proteins. The urea is then released into the bloodstream and carried to the kidneys where it can be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Urea

Urea is the final breakdown product of the amino acids found in proteins. The urea is then released into the bloodstream and carried to the kidneys where it can be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Urea

Urea is the final breakdown product of the amino acids found in proteins. The urea is then released into the bloodstream and carried to the kidneys where it can be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.
When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Calcium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Adjusted Calcium

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Potassium

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Urea

Urea is the final breakdown product of the amino acids found in proteins. The urea is then released into the bloodstream and carried to the kidneys where it can be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Calcium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Adjusted Calcium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Potassium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Sodium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Salt & Minerals      

Electrolytes play a vital role in conducting electrical impulses in and around the body. For example, the heart, your muscles, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells and release hormones. Our test shows you exactly what you need to maintain normal levels in your body.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Phosphorous

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Calcium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Adjusted Calcium

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Potassium


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Sodium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

Chloride

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.

Bicarbonate


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Urea

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Creatinine

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Glomerular filtration rate

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body. It helps regulate fluid balance, muscle contractions and nerve signals. What's more, a high-potassium diet may help reduce blood pressure, water retention, and protect against strokes.

The main function of phosphorus is in the formation of bones and teeth. It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.


Not only is calcium important for maintain bone health, but it also plays a big part in muscle metabolism. If your dietary intake of calcium is low, your body will pull calcium from the bones to be utilised in its many other functions. This test will show you whether you are maintaining a proper calcium intake.

Half of the calcium that travels in the bloodstream is attached to proteins. This form of calcium is inactive. The other half of calcium travels freely and remains active. Measuring only total calcium may not be representative of true calcium status as fluctuations in protein levels can impact calcium. The adjusted calcium test only measures the free, active form of calcium to more accurately gauge status. 


Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Potassium

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Potassium

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Urea

Urea is the final breakdown product of the amino acids found in proteins. The urea is then released into the bloodstream and carried to the kidneys where it can be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine.

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Potassium is a mineral found in the foods you eat. It is also an electrolyte that conducts electrical impulses throughout the body. Potassium has different functions, including maintaining blood pressure, heart rhythm and nerve impulses.

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Urea is the final breakdown product of the amino acids found in proteins. The urea is then released into the bloodstream and carried to the kidneys where it can be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine.

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

Bone Health    

Bone health is extremely important, as your bones need to be strong and sturdy enough to hold up your entire body. Our bones are living tissues, constantly regenerating to maintain proper health — this changes as we age. Know your bone health with this test.

Sodium

Sodium, often referred to as salt, is found in nearly everything you eat and drink. Sodium occurs naturally in several foods, is often added to foods during the manufacturing process, and is used as a flavour enhancer for many foods. Sodium is necessary for your health. It plays a vital role in nerve and muscle function and helps your body maintain normal fluid balance.

Chloride

Chloride is one of the components of salt used in cooking and other foods. It is also found in many chemicals and other substances in the body. Chloride is needed to keep the proper balance of body fluids, and it is an essential part of digestive fluid that's formed within the stomach lining.

Bicarbonate

When you breathe, you bring oxygen (O2) into your lungs and release carbon dioxide (CO2). Carbon dioxide in your blood is present in three forms: carbonic acid (H2CO3), CO2 dissolved in blood, and bicarbonate (HCO3-), the predominant form. Bicarbonate is a negatively charged ion that is excreted and reabsorbed by your kidneys.


Urea

Urea is the final breakdown product of the amino acids found in proteins. The urea is then released into the bloodstream and carried to the kidneys where it can be filtered out of the blood and excreted in the urine.

Creatinine

Creatinine is a waste product of creatine metabolism, an amino acid (building block of proteins) made by the liver and stored in the liver. Creatinine is produced in muscle when creatine is metabolised to generate energy. Creatinine is not reabsorbed or secreted, but is completely filtered through your kidneys. Thus, its rate of excretion from your bloodstream is directly related to how well your kidneys filter.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Kidney Function   

Kidneys detoxify by filtering the blood and transforming that waste into urine. It's important to always keep this organ in check as it ensures there is no toxin build up in your body — our test will show you how efficient your kidney function is through a series of biomarkers and whether you need to make lifestyle and dietary changes.

Glomerular filtration rate

Glomerular filtration is the first step in making urine. It is the process that your kidneys use to filter excess fluid and waste products out of the blood into the urine collecting tubules of the kidney, so they may be eliminated from your body.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are electrolytes?

Electrolytes are chemicals that conduct electricity when mixed with water. They regulate nerve and muscle function, hydrate the body, balance blood acidity and pressure, and help rebuild damaged tissue. The muscles and neurons are sometimes referred to as the “electric tissues” of the body. They rely on the movement of electrolytes through the fluid inside, outside, or between cells. When these substances become imbalanced, it can lead to either muscle weakness or excessive contraction. The heart, muscle, and nerve cells use electrolytes to carry electrical impulses to other cells.

How do I know if my electrolytes are unbalanced? 

The body changes its level of electrolytes throughout the day, and minor shifts in levels is not necessarily a cause for concern. For example, the level of your electrolytes can decrease during and after your exercise as the body has exerted energy. Levels can also become unbalanced when the water levels in your body change throughout the day.

However, the level of an electrolyte in the blood can become too high or too low, leading to an imbalance. This can be caused by more intense causes such as the rapid loss of fluids through diarrhea or vomiting. These electrolytes must be replaced to maintain healthy levels. The kidneys and several hormones regulate the concentration of each electrolyte. If levels of a substance are too high, the kidneys filter it from the body, and different hormones act to balance the levels.

Signs of an electrolyte imbalance are an overall feeling of weakness, muscle spasms, brain fog, fatigue, and changes in blood pressure. Regular monitoring and consuming electrolytes after intense exercise or sweating profusely can help to preserve levels. Be sure to stay hydrated at all times.

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